Third, Fourth, and Fifth Grades

Program Overview

 

 

 

In Grades 3-5, students continue to develop a foundation of basic motor skills.  Students’ physical characteristics include steady growth, although girls are developing more rapidly than boys.  Students possess more refined gross motor skills, more refined manipulative skills, more highly developed balance skills, and improved body control.  During these grades, many students progress from being teacher-dependent to being self-guided.  They also experience increased social and emotional development, becoming more concerned with pleasing their peers.

 

The instructional environment for physical education in Grades 3-5 may include locations such as a gymnasium, classroom, hallway, cafeteria, playground, walking trail, ball field, wooded area, or parking lot.  Regardless of the location, effective instruction includes a clearly defined purpose for the activity and guidance in applying correct and safe procedures.  Activities encourage maximum participation for all students and the development of positive social interactive behaviors.  An adequate supply of appropriate equipment is essential to allow for participation by all students.

 

By the fourth grade, the development of locomotor skills is relatively complete.  At this level, the emphasis shifts to the development of manipulative and nonlocomotor skills.  Locomotor skills continue to be refined as they are used in combination with other skills.

 

Health-enhancing activity is accomplished through the use of experiences that assist students in identifying the types of activities most beneficial for developing and maintaining personal fitness.  Students begin to assess their personal fitness status and learn how to develop a personal fitness program that includes proper warm-up, conditioning, and cool-down.

 

Interactive behavior focuses on cooperation with other students and with teachers to participate in and learn more about a variety of physical activities.  This includes applying proper rules and procedures as well as using correct etiquette during participation.  Teachers design activities throughout the program to allow students opportunities to work together for the purpose of developing social skills (cooperative and competitive), responsible behavior, and positive attitudes regarding participation in physical education.

 

 

 

 


         MOTOR SKILL                         INTERACTIVE           HEALTH-ENHANCING

         DEVELOPMENT                       BEHAVIOR                  ACTIVITY

 

 

 

LESS EMPHASIS                             MORE EMPHASIS                      LESS EMPHASIS


Third Grade

 

 

 

Students’ chronological ages in third grade range from seven to nine.  Students in this range are becoming more proficient in motor skill development and general body management.  They are also experiencing a general increase in muscular strength, endurance, flexibility, agility, balance, and gross motor coordination.  This natural process of growth and development enhances cardiovascular/respiratory function, allowing for more active participation in physical education.

 

Third-grade students are moving from teacher-guided to self-guided activities.  The physical education classroom environment provides for an increased focus on the development of self-reliance and self-directed skills.  Emphasis is placed on working independently and on task for extended periods of time.  Activities are designed to allow all students to develop efficient, effective, and expressive movement skills.  These skills enable students to demonstrate locomotor skills while combining movement concepts in a variety of manipulative activities.

 

 


Third Grade

 

Goal:  Motor Skill Development

 

 

 

CONTENT STANDARDS

BENCHMARKS

 

 

 

 

Students will:

As a result of participating in a quality physical education program, it is reasonable to expect that the student will be able to:

 

Skill

    1.    Demonstrate skills, including leaping and skipping, using mature motor patterns.

  Walking

  Running

  Jumping

  Hopping

  Galloping

  Sliding

 

Combine leaping and skipping with a variety of other motor skills.

 

Jump and land for height and distance.

 

Leap, leading with either foot.

    2.    Demonstrate developmentally appropriate levels of nonlocomotor skills with transfer of weight.

  Twisting

  Turning

  Leaning

  Stretching

  Curling

  Bending

  Swinging

  Balancing

 

Transfer weight in a variety of body positions in response to directions.

 

Combine nonlocomotor skills and weight transfer in activities such as rolling, tumbling, yoga, and rhythmic dancing.

 

    3.    Exhibit key characteristics of manipulative skills during performance, including throwing, catching, and kicking.

Dribble a ball with the foot, maintaining control while traveling within a group.

 

Throw or catch different objects, using a variety of techniques.

 

Step with opposition when throwing an object.

 

 

    4.    Demonstrate the ability to strike using body parts, short-handled implements, long-handled implements, and moving objects.

 

Volley objects such as balloons, beach balls, and foam balls continuously using hand, foot, knee, or head.

 

Strike an object continuously with a variety of instruments such as a paddle, racket, or stick, demonstrating the forehand with the dominant hand.

 

Strike a hockey puck with a stick to move it through an obstacle course.

 

Strike a softball with a bat.


Goal:  Motor Skill Development (continued)

 

 

 

CONTENT STANDARDS

BENCHMARKS

 

 

 

 

Students will:

As a result of participating in a quality physical education program, it is reasonable to expect

that the student will be able to:

 

Knowledge

    5.    Discuss concepts that improve the quality of movement as it relates to space, effort, and relationships.

Use feedback given by a partner to improve control techniques in a basketball dribble.

 

Identify space, effort, and relationship concepts in skills such as dribbling high or low.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Application

    6.    Apply movement concepts to locomotor, nonlocomotor, and manipulative activities.

 

 

 

Throw at different levels.

 

Kick with force; kick gently.

 

Demonstrate knowledge of space, effort, and relationship concepts.

 

 

 

    7.    Combine locomotor, nonlocomotor, and manipulative skills in a variety of activities.

Avoid or catch an object while traveling.

 

Avoid or chase others in a tag game.

 

 


Goal:  Health-Enhancing Activity

 

 

 

CONTENT STANDARDS

BENCHMARKS

 

 

 

 

Students will:

As a result of participating in a quality physical education program, it is reasonable to expect that the student will be able to:

 

Knowledge

    8.    Identify the physiological indicators that accompany moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

Example:    sweating, increased heart rate, heavy breathing

 

 

List changes occurring in the body during moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

 

    9.    Associate results of daily fitness activity with personal health status and ability to perform various skills.

Identify benefits of daily physical exercise such as sleeping better, relieving stress, concentrating better, or improving performance on an activity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Application

  10.    Engage in regular physical activity for the purpose of improving skill and personal health.

Participate in regular physical activities such as dancing, hiking, or biking to develop a healthy lifestyle.

 

Work independently in pursuit of personal fitness goals.

 

 


Goal:  Interactive Behavior

 

 

 

CONTENT STANDARDS

BENCHMARKS

 

 

 

 

Students will:

As a result of participating in a quality physical education program, it is reasonable to expect that the student will be able to:

 

Knowledge

  11.    Recognize safe practices when performing skills.

Demonstrate awareness of personal space while jumping rope.

 

  12.    Identify physical education class rules and procedures.

Conform to class rules.

 

Follow directions without prompting.

 

Explain procedures for fire, tornado, and other emergency action plans that apply to a specific school setting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Application

  13.    Exhibit cooperative skills in partner or small-group settings.

Work cooperatively with teachers and others to improve skill performance.

 

Share personal successes and achievements of self and others.

 

Relate positively to people with a variety of mental and physical abilities.

 

Include children with special needs in games and activities.

 

 

  14.    Demonstrate elements of acceptable conflict resolution.

 

Apply the concept of I.D.E.A. (Identify the problem, Describe the possibilities, Evaluate the possibilities, Act on the idea).

 

Express appropriate statements of forgiveness and apology.

 

 

  15.    Work independently and on task for extended periods of time.

Throw and catch a ball to self for teacher-designated amount of time.

 

Practice free throw shooting in activity station to improve skill.

 

Practice line dance steps repeatedly for stated amount of time.

 

 

  16.    Participate in an event that promotes physical education.

Participate in a school Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) program that promotes physical education.

 

Create posters that depict favorite sports, skills, games, or activities.

 


Fourth Grade

 

 

 

Students in fourth grade experience increased interest in social and emotional development as they become more concerned with peer acceptance.  Overall increases in physical growth and development begin to stabilize as the development of gross-motor skills is equalized in both boys and girls.

 

To address the interests of all students, the fourth-grade curriculum focuses on personal skill development in terms of refining fundamental movement patterns associated with a variety of small games, modified sports, dance and rhythm, and gymnastics.  This curriculum provides students with opportunities to develop positive attitudes toward physical education.  The instructional environment provides equal opportunities for boys and girls to participate in individual, partner, and small-group activities.  This instructional setting allows students to further refine self-reliance skills and begin to participate in partner-based cooperative situations.  Group dynamic concepts are also explored during instruction.


Fourth Grade

 

Goal:  Motor Skill Development

 

 

 

CONTENT STANDARDS

BENCHMARKS

 

 

 

 

Students will:

As a result of participating in a quality physical education program, it is reasonable to expect that the student will be able to:

 

Skill

    1.    Demonstrate mature form of all nonlocomotor skills, including twisting, turning, leaning, stretching, curling, bending, swinging, balancing, and transferring of weight.

 

 

Balance with control on a moving object such as a balance board.

 

Perform a forward roll with correct form by combining the necessary nonlocomotor skills (bending, curling, or transferring weight) with motion.

 

    2.    Demonstrate selected manipulative skills, including throwing, catching, and kicking, while using proper mechanics and accuracy.

 

Throw and catch an object consistently with a partner.

 

Kick a ball successfully to a partner.

 

    3.    Demonstrate control while striking with short-handled implements.

Use a short-handled implement to strike a ball or balloon continuously with control.

 

Strike an object to a teammate with a short-handled implement during a modified game such as scooter hockey or air hockey.

 

 

    4.    Demonstrate mature form when striking with long-handled implements in static situations.

Volley an object in the air or on the ground continuously with a long-handled racquet using the dominant and nondominant side.

 

Strike an object repeatedly against a wall with a hockey stick or a bat using proper mechanics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Knowledge

    5.    Recognize correct and incorrect forms of motor skills.

 

 

 

 

 

Identify teacher-performed motor skills as correct or incorrect.


Goal:  Motor Skill Development (continued)

 

 

 

CONTENT STANDARDS

BENCHMARKS

 

 

 

 

Students will:

As a result of participating in a quality physical education program, it is reasonable to expect that the student will be able to:

 

Application

    6.    Apply concepts that improve the quality of performance while traveling.

Dribble a basketball while moving in a zigzag pattern.

 

Jump and land for height or distance, bending knees to absorb force.

 

    7.    Adapt combined movement skills in a variety of situations.

Perform dance sequences that combine traveling, balancing, and weight transfer into smooth, flowing sequences with intentional changes in direction, speed, and flow.

 

Dribble while preventing an opponent from getting possession of a ball.

 

Play small-group games that involve cooperating with others to keep an object away from an opponent and demonstrating basic offensive and defensive strategies while throwing, kicking, or dribbling a ball.

 


Goal:  Health-Enhancing Activity

 

 

 

CONTENT STANDARDS

BENCHMARKS

 

 

 

 

Students will:

As a result of participating in a quality physical education program, it is reasonable to expect that the student will be able to:

 

Knowledge

    8.    Identify activities that correlate with the components of health-enhancing physical activity (flexibility, muscular endurance, muscular strength, and cardiovascular endurance).

 

 

Match fitness components to a variety of games, sports, dance, and recreational activities.

 

    9.    Differentiate among intensity levels of exercise.

Describe signs of low, medium, and high levels of exercise.

 

Maintain a record of resting, exercise, and recovery heart rate for a vigorous physical activity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Application

  10.    Record participation in self-selected activities that improve identified areas of weakness in personal fitness.

Identify weaknesses in personal fitness such as inflexibility and shortness of breath.

 

Select activities to improve an identified weakness.

 

 

 

 

 

  11.    Identify resources available in the community that offer opportunities for physical fitness activities.

 

Record after-school activities in a personal fitness log.


Goal:  Interactive Behavior

 

 

 

CONTENT STANDARDS

BENCHMARKS

 

 

 

 

Students will:

As a result of participating in a quality physical education program, it is reasonable to expect that the student will be able to:

 

Knowledge

  12.    Recognize the attributes that individuals bring to group activities.

 

 

 

 

 

Use individual strengths of team members to improve game strategy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Application

  13.    Collaborate with a partner or small group for a common purpose.

Work cooperatively and productively with a partner to improve a skill.

 

Work with a partner or small group to design games and dance sequences.

 

  14.    Demonstrate a physical activity as a means of self-expression.

 

 

 

Design a jump rope routine, dance sequence, or gymnastics routine.

 

Share personal successes and achievements of self and others.

 

Provide positive feedback to peers.

 

 

 

  15.    Relate positively to people of different backgrounds while participating in activities of different national, cultural, and ethnic origins.

 

Recognize differences and similarities in multicultural games and activities.

 

Accept individual differences within a group while playing multicultural games.


Goal:  Interactive Behavior (continued)

 

 

 

CONTENT STANDARDS

BENCHMARKS

 

 

 

 

Students will:

As a result of participating in a quality physical education program, it is reasonable to expect that the student will be able to:

 

Application

  16.    Apply specific rules, strategies, and etiquette to activities with minimal reminders.

 

 

Use fundamental rules and strategies while participating in simple games and activities.

 

  17.    Organize a presentation for others that promotes awareness of physical activity.

Design a poster depicting a physical activity for display.

 

Compose an essay about a physical education topic.

 

 

 

 


Fifth Grade

 

 

 

In fifth grade, differences exist in the process of physical growth and development between girls and boys.  Girls experience increases in fine motor skills, cognitive ability, and the beginning of prepubescence.  Boys at this grade level tend to demonstrate increases in upper body strength and development, while physical interest and competitiveness are easily observed during game situations.

 

The fifth-grade curriculum focuses on individual skill refinement through an increased amount of practice time in more complex game and sport situations.  Applying rules, procedures, and etiquette is emphasized to allow for social interaction concept development.  Many of the activities incorporate the use of manipulatives and encourage maximum participation for extended periods within the class setting.

 

In fifth grade, student participation in daily physical activity is emphasized, with the objective of working independently on personal fitness goals and refining and applying skills.  Participating in group activities also allows students to learn to recognize others’ attributes while benefiting from cooperative activities.


Fifth Grade

 

Goal:  Motor Skill Development

 

 

 

CONTENT STANDARDS

BENCHMARKS

 

 

 

 

Students will:

As a result of participating in a quality physical education program, it is reasonable to expect that the student will be able to:

 

Skill

    1.    Perform the critical elements of opposition, balance, weight transfer, and fluid movement patterns involved in all nonlocomotor skills.

 

 

Maintain balance on one foot or on stilts.

 

Swing a bat or racquet while transferring weight correctly from the back foot to the front foot.

 

Use twisting, turning, leaning, stretching, and curling in a fitness routine.

 

Transfer weight from feet to hands at fast and slow speeds using large extensions in activities such as mule kicks, hand stands, or cartwheels.

 

    2.    Demonstrate the critical elements of opposition, balance, weight transfer, and fluid movement patterns involved in all basic manipulative skills.

 

 

Throw and catch a variety of objects while demonstrating consistency and accuracy.

 

Volley, dribble, and kick a ball using correct motor patterns.

 

Use a badminton racquet to volley a badminton birdie continuously with a partner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Knowledge

    3.    Describe how the movement concepts of time, force, flow, direction, level, pathways, and relationships impact the quality of complex movement patterns.

 

Demonstrate knowledge of space, effort, and relationship concepts.

 

Use concepts of space awareness and movement control to run, hop, and skip in different ways in a large group without bumping into others or falling.

 

    4.    Describe balance and weight transfer in a game, sport, dance, or gymnastic routine.

 

Explain the need for balance in a variety of activities such as leaning forward for an underhand volleyball serve or transferring weight in striking.

 

 

    5.    Recognize basic concepts of game strategies.

Explain ways to keep an object away from opponents.

 

Keep an opponent from reaching a specified area.


Goal:  Motor Skill Development (continued)

 

 

 

CONTENT STANDARDS

BENCHMARKS

 

 

 

 

Students will:

As a result of participating in a quality physical education program, it is reasonable to expect that the student will be able to:

 

Application

    6.    Perform movement concepts in increasingly complex patterns.

Throw at different levels.

 

Kick with various levels of force.

 

Demonstrate hand and foot dribbles in motion while preventing an opponent from getting possession of the ball in activities such as dribbling a soccer ball or basketball.

 

 

 

    7.    Critique elements of fundamental and specialized movement skills to provide feedback to others.

 

 

 

Recognize the critical elements of a throw made by another student.

 

Describe characteristics and outcomes of a kick performed by another student.

 


Goal:  Health-Enhancing Activity

 

 

 

CONTENT STANDARDS

BENCHMARKS

 

 

 

 

Students will:

As a result of participating in a quality physical education program, it is reasonable to expect that the student will be able to:

 

Knowledge

    8.    Identify basic principles of training and conditioning for physical activities.

 

 

 

Explain proper warm-ups, conditioning, and cool-down techniques and the reasons for using them.

    9.    Associate results of fitness testing with personal fitness goals and the ability to perform various activities.

Use fitness test scores to assess current personal fitness level and set attainable goals for improvement.

 

Explain the relationship of personal fitness to performance in games and sports activities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Application

  10.    Engage in daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in a variety of settings.

 

 

 

Engage in physical activity at the target heart rate for a minimum of 20 minutes.

 

Participate, both in and out of school, in games, sports, dance, and recreational activities based on individual interests.

 

Maintain a personal fitness log.

 

  11.    Develop an individual fitness plan based on personal fitness goals.

 

Present fitness goals in a small-group setting.

 

  12.    Utilize information from a variety of sources to improve fitness/skill performance.

Use various sources of feedback to correct ineffective movement patterns.

 

Analyze a sports skill from a videotape to improve performance.

 

 


Goal:  Interactive Behavior

 

 

 

CONTENT STANDARDS

BENCHMARKS

 

 

 

 

Students will:

As a result of participating in a quality physical education program, it is reasonable to expect that the student will be able to:

 

Knowledge

  13.    Recognize individual differences and similarities while participating in group activities.

 

Participate willingly in physical activities without regard to personal differences.

 

Demonstrate respect for persons with similar and different skill levels.

 

 

 

 

           

 

 

 

 

 

 

Application

  14.    Create physical activities that provide opportunities for enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, social interaction, and integration of other subject areas.

 

Design gymnastic routines, dance sequences, and/or cooperative/competitive games based on personal interests.

 

Suggest modifications for improving a game or activity.

 

Provide leadership opportunities in activities or games.

 

  15.    Work independently to improve movement skills.

Practice, on an independent basis, a specific skill that results in increased accuracy and consistency.

 

  16.    Apply rules, procedures, and etiquette to physical activities.

Accept rulings made by student officials and teachers.

 

Officiate small games and activities within peer groups.